Working


You might find that even after you receive all your financial aid, you still have an “unmet need”—money that you will have to come up with on your own. There are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Try to get a job on-campus, if possible. These jobs tend to be more understanding in dealing with your class and exam schedules and you probably don’t need a car to get to them.
  • Keep your work hours reasonable. It doesn’t do you any good working to pay for college if you work so much that you end up failing your classes because you can’t do your reading or homework.
  • Working during college can actually be a benefit. Students who work tend to become better at managing their time and may actually do better in their classes than students who don’t have to work, as long as the hours they work does not go beyond a reasonable level.

Using these sources—federal, state, and university aid, as well as private scholarships and some part-time work, you should be able to fund a college education that will likely reap you many benefits in the long run!